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in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate economies by means o
in europe -- but greece -- puts greece as the most corrupt country in europe. >> germany is mulling over whether to try to outlaw a far- right party accused of stirring up anti-immigrant sentiment. minister >> to go formal step toward banning the national democratic party, -- ministers took a formal step toward banning the national democratic party, the npd. some worry that prohibiting the party could backfire. it could drum up sympathy for the far right. >> the ministers are united in their call for a ban on meat npd. they reviewed extensive -- on the npd. they reviewed extensive documentation before making up their mind. >> i never would have thought they were so anti-democratic or anti-semitic. or so oriented towards violence and so unconstitutional. we have been discussing a ban for 12 years. now we have a lot of material to go on, much more than ever before. >> the ministers will seek to the government's support for the ban. one federal interior minister said they have a good case, but he admits there are risks. >> the danger is that these proceedings could give new life to a party
, should be vigorously pursued and the culprits punished. greece, meanwhile, is still struggling to get back on its feet financially. the country would desperately like to have more tax revenues, but it is not enough to just raise taxes for private households. companies would also need to pay their fair share, and there are greek companies which are still doing well despite the financial crisis. but not all are willing to foot the bill for others. that is why some companies are relocating to switzerland, for instance. >> 66-year-old george moved to switzerland 20 years ago to set up a software company in geneva. he made over 200 million euros. now, many of his fellow greeks are looking to follow in his footsteps, and he can see why -- not only does he love the beautiful swiss countryside and the country's efficiency, he also appreciates its low rate of taxation. >> it is not illegal, but morally unacceptable that in some comfort -- countries, you have to pay 50% tax. anybody who wants to have a good quality life -- i find it proper no more. it has to do with tax. >> tax regulation is es
stories of the year. and, why china set up shop in greece at the height of the euro crisis. but first, this "in the know" message. the euro crisis continued to remain a major concern for investors throughout the course of 2012. at the center of it all, greece. the country grappled with a need for bailouts with strings attached in the form of severe budget cuts that sparked protests from the people. however, the financial crisis in europe is providing an opportunity for china. earlier this year, we heard from new york times reporter liz alderman on a chinese shipping company that is making waves in greece. > > how successful has this shipping company, known as cosco, been so far in greece? > > it's an interesting story. this chinese basically state- run shipping company came in here about three years ago in a $500 million deal that ever since then has been a model for the country, because what they did is they bought half of piraeus port, which is an ancient port in greece and one of the most important ports in the southern mediterranean. what they did was they basically took an operat
with a daring new plan to save greece. >> welcome back. greece has announced a plan to buy back bonds as part of its effort to reduce its debt load. >> the success of the plan is essential to unlocking the next payment of eight athens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work -- of aid to a thens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work. >> german finance minister wolfgang schaeuble and his french counterpart, pierre moscovici, went in front of parliament. >> things have to move fast. there is no reason to worry. the calculations are realistic. i hope it works. >> there is no plan b. >> the finance ministers brushoff warnings that the programs might not reduce greek debt enough. spain has formally asked for almost 40 billion euros in aid for its troubled banking sector. >> a strong indication that we have been successful in stabilizing the eurozone. spain now leads -- need less than originally assumed. the situation has improved. >> another trouble spot is cyprus. the country needs a bailout of between 10 billion euros and 17 billion euros. officials are waiting for our report on
for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just th
? check out greece. that's what happens when a country avoids making tough fiscal decisions for too long. >>> a top republican pollster about what went wrong on their side. a lot of information coming here and why if republicans don't change the way they do business they may be on the losing end of elections for years to come. plus, the black helicopter crowd is at it again. republicans in the senate reject a united nations treaty to ban discrimination against the disabled. they say it would allow u.n. officials to come into this country and force home-schooled children into government-run, that is public schools. senator john kerry joins us to cut through the nonsense. >>> also tonight, the simpson's mr. burns gives us a rich man's look at the fiscal cliff. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver, he'll drive you over a cliff. >> that's an aside show and this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> never too early for pollsters to start head to 2016. guess who's looking very strong? hillary clinton. a new abc news/washington post
, european finance ministers have said yes to releasing more aid to greece. in a 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens -- >> the 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens. >> there are some who believe it is nothing more than a band-aid. >> emotions spilled over as workers tried to storm a meeting between greek and german officials today are angry over layoffs that are part of broad austerity measures. greeks see the reason to believe next year will be any better. >> they may receive the tranche, but it would be spent in a few months. we will soon be asking for more money. i don't see how that will help the economy. >> one minister remains hopeful, consulting with his counterparts on how to get the economy back on its feet. >> we want to work together to organize a support fund to promote economic growth in greece. >> but that would require attracting private investors. to do that, greece must first settle it unpaid bills. >> of the 9 billion euros that greece still owes, we will pay back everything by 2013 in accordance with the troika deal. >> so, for now, greek
in recent history? and if things are so bad why haven't the british like say the people of greece or spain taken to the streets? to discuss this i'm joined by ian beg who is a research fellow at the london school of economics. so professor beg, we hear talk this being the worst recession since the second world war. is it? >> it's been a long recession and it's very slow to see any kind of recovery. but it's also worth remembering statistically although being one of the worst in the last century, we actually today are as well off as in 2006. we've only gone back by a few steps. >> is it simply a case that it feels like the worst recession that anyone can remember? >> it's the fact that it hasn't gone to a recovery phase. tore used to in a recession have a deep downturn followed bay quite rapid recovery. it takes longer to readdress individual positions in their debt. and that means that it lasts much longer than everybody expects because everybody tries to save. >> so if things aren't very bleak across europe, why is it that in some countries as in greece and in spain we've seen the protest
in neighboring turkey, lebanon, and jordan. a much smaller number have made their way to greece. this report from lesbos just off the coast of turkey. >> the immigrants who wash ashore on the greek islands are now struggling with their first european winter. they are somalis, afghanistan annies, and, increates -- increasingly, syrians. all at a camp run by volunteers who provide food and shelter the this is ahmed, who has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brothner athens. >> our life is destroyed in syria. we cannot stay in syria. the war airplanes float in the sky and bombing the houses, we cannot stay in syria. >> the turkish mainland is not far behind me. it's not far away but the journey is very dangerous. the boats supplied by people smugglers are often old and in bad condition, and at this time be year the seas could be very rough. not everyone makes it across. these were afghanis. more than 20 drowned. here is the only survivor, who was fished half-dead and freezing cold out of the sea by greek coast guards. now trying to call friends and family to tell them he's alive
are your percentage chances that the u.s. will eventually end up like greece? >> well, look, if i could just answer that, i'm an optimist on america. i believe in america. i'd buy it, you know, if america was a publicly-traded company, i'd buy the stock every day. this country and this economy is tremendously resilient. and one of the great things, i think, about our book is it's got ideas that require action in washington, it's also at state level, individual level and there's some business and corporate level. so, you know, what are the odds? i would, you know, i'm an on the optimist. i would say we will get back to growth. >> kevin? >> the oecd, which is an organization that studies large, developed nations just did a big study to try to identify how big the policy challenges facing the nations around the world are. and they estimated something called the fiscal adjustment, and the fiscal adjustment for greece that they need -- which is either the immediate tax increase or the immediate reduction in spending necessary to make it so that their economy doesn't just explode is about 3%
that a crucial vote on egypt's constitution could be delayed. we've got the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian predent mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement his sweeping powers. earlier today protesters broke through the barriers around the presidential palace. police fired tear gas at a crowd of almost 1000 people out seed cairo tv studios. we have a fox news contributor, specializing in middleeast counterterrorism affairs. lisa, it looks like things are getting more out of control all the time. people keep saying ts is going to calm down. what is your, what is your take on it? >> well, as long as moi's factions, the muslim brotherhood will remain steadfast in a power grab d maintaining their agenda, the people, opposition saying this is not what we fought for the company will remain in perpetual rev
. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german working-class, because we are not going to allow you to be made to pay for those lazy southern european
. >> thanks for joining us. another moment of truth for athens -- when greece finds out weather its author -- offer to repurchase debt from private investors has paid off. that will help trigger the release of more rescue funds that greece so desperately needs to stay afloat. >> athens has offered to pay 10 billion euros to holders of its sovereign debt at a buyback value of up to 40 cents per euro. to be successful, the sale has to cut a greek national debt by 20 billion euros. news from athens made investors nervous this friday. our correspondence sent us this report from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the suspense on the stock trading floor that weather or not the creditors of greece would take part in the debt buyback was too much for many investors. they decided to take some of the book's profits and sell shares. shares of deutsche telekom were the biggest dax losers. in order to invest money into new technologies such as broadband networks, they decided to cut the dividend for investors. now, many people here fear that this is something that more companies might do also next year,
with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
that the andard & poor's has upgraded greece's sovereign credit rating by six notches. the ratings agency cited the country's commitment to debt reduction and monetary injections by international lenders. s&p raised greece's credit rating on tuesday from selective default to b-minus. the new rating is still low and not suited to investment, but s&p officials say the outlook is stable. the greek government bought back sovereign bonds from commercial banks and the private sector earlier this month at prices lower than the face value. s&p officials praised the euro zone members' decision to provide greece with financial support. they say the upgrade reflects s&p's view that greece's neighbors are serious about keeping the country in the eurozone. >>> back here in japan the trade deficit came to about $11.3 billion in november, posting a red for a fifth month in a row. finance ministry officials say the figure is a record high for november. that's the third highest level since comparable records became available back in 1979. exports fell by 4.1% from a year earlier in yen terms. exports have falle
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . [ abdul-raid ] i've been working since i was about 16. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- you know, it's like it just hits you fast. you know, you start thinking about what's really important here. ♪ music is a universal language. but when i was in an accent... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i neverissed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people lookingut for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian president mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement
. >> thank you very much, harry. greece is bracing for more public-sector strikes against government austerity measures. the rail system has ground to a halt. but there has been good news. rating agency standard and poor's upgraded greece's standing, making it much easier to borrow money in international markets. it is the second-biggest fine levied on a bank. switzerland that the ubs agreed to pay $1.5 billion in penalties. regulators in the u.s., u.k. and sorts when charged ubs and manipulating a key interest rate known as libor. >> his was person -- pervasive manipulation of global benchmark interest rates by dozens of staff across three continents. and the heavy fine reflects the regulator's concerns. the ubs chief executives said those of all but the extent of the fraud and bribes maybe revealed by further criminal investigations. in just one instance revealed by the u.k. financial services authority, ubs made corrupt payments of around $24,000 a quarter for 18 months to brokers to thank them for helping them manipulate the global industry. libor is used to price more than $350
for the indebted country. the u.s. ratings agency standard and poor's has upgraded greece's credit ratings. their best reading since june 2011. >> the agency they credited the eurozone strong support for greece, and it is committed to keeping athens in the currency. the upgrade comes after the successful creek by that program earlier this month. the former ceo of car maker porsche is facing charges of market manipulation relating to the company's attempt to buy volkswagen back in 2008. >> is accused of denying portion of's takeover plans, although the move was already under way. prosecutors say that had an impact on the share price, and investors were misled. the takeover ultimately failed, and portia was itself bought out by vw. -- porsche itself was bought out by volkswagen. >> 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, and lift off. >> on board are one american, one russian, and a canadian. it will take a crack about to be would days to reach the iss. -- it will take the craft about two days to reach the iss. vulcanologists in russia have been able to get a glimpse of a spectacular eruption in siberia. it began er
from becoming greece. no more borrowing without addressing why we're in debt to begin with. that's where the real chance for change occurs, at the debt ceiling debate. >> we're joined now by ralph sill voe. it's christmas eve. do you have some plans to do? >> it's an austerity christmas, actually. just a couple friends getting together and a couple of friends getting together and having a nice meal. >> it is not an austerity christmas. >> it actually is. we haven't had the greatest year. everything we hoped would happen. we thought this economy was going to turn around at the summer period. >> ralph, if you take a look at the stock market concerns, the dax is up 20%. >> there will be plenty of alcohol to forget. >> do you think we're going to manage to see some type of a resolution on the fiscal cliff? we're seeing a lot of finger pointing now and hearing from both sides saying it's in the other side's interest to delay these negotiations. >> i've had conversations with people in new york and working on trade floors. what i've been told by them is there is a huge number of meetin
story. that i would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of
to talk about greece or not, whether i want to dive straight into the banking union and what chance have we possibly got of getting agreement. >> let's talk about greece, much more fun. no, greece we have to get out of the way. is the debt by back program going to be successful, everyone nds it will. we know that's the one little lynchpin on which everything else rests. so if it's not, the money will not flow, but everybody insists as when he headed into the euro group meeting yesterday that it will be successful. that's also what what we hear from the greeks. there's a bit of arm fwising, but it will probably go through. and then lo and behold ahead of the actual summit in the morning, they can sign up the check for the next greek installment also we hope. we're also closer to a little rescue package for cypress. spanish aid package for the banks is on track. so that was the working list last night. another thing on the to-do list. the head of the euro group confirmed last night that, no, i will not extend anything now, i will definitely leave as head of the euro group at the end of thi
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
with the resources at hand. -- >> the c.s. becoming like greece? >> no, that is a profoundly -- do you see as becoming like greece? >> that is a profoundly different situation. the congressional budget office says that if we stay on the course we are on, we will have a debt that is 230% of our gross domestic product of the the next 20 years. most experts say once you get a debt of more than 9% of gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth in a significant way. this is just about -- not just about numbers on page, it is really about opportunities for people. whether you will be able to send your kid to school, to college, whether it will be able to buy a car, my house, whether we will have economic opportunity for the people of the country. the best academic research that has been done shows that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast. opportunity is lost. jobs are lost. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talk
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
reached on the banking up. it's integrity is good for the agreement and as we focus on greece today, conditions are in place to disburse the next tranche of aid to greece totalling 43 billion euros. >>> over to japan, voters are heading to the poll on sunday. the major indicators suggest a win for the opposition party. the local media says there is still a large pool of undecided japanese voters. kari enjoji has more on this report from tokyo. >> reporter: 12 parties, some less than a month ole are fielding 1,504 candidates. but instead of being slow for choice, voters say i just don't know. polls suggest the prime minister's democratic party is unraveling, hinting that many first-time politicians that swept the party to a victory three years ago could be wiped out. >> it's quite possible that the cpj will sink from neing first or second but possibly to even third parties in japanese politics. >> the dpj's handling of the fukushima disaster and undelivered economic promises have alien ated many voters. if the liberal democratic party wins, shinzo abi could with the newest restoratio
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and stalin in october of 44. dividing up -- the british forget 90% of greece and the russians would get 90% of bulgaria and hungary and they divided up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies, in april of 45, his last telegram to churchill was, we always have these minor disagreements with the russians but we end up resolving them. so let's not make a big deal. there's no reason we can't maintain friendship after the war. when truman gets in there on april 12, 1945, immediately takes a different course. roosevelts alliance with the wartime alliance with the soviets was still strong at that point the truman turns to advisers who roosevelt never trusted in the first place and didn't pay heed to. people like burns and second day he flies burns through his private plane and burns gets german the same message. the soviets are breaking all of their agreements and they can't be trusted. and so what we are going to see is within two weeks the u.s. policy toward the soviet union's going to change in april 1945. by the time there's the big meeting on april 23 with molotov and on apr
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
and the year rose own economy. we might not be in worse shape than greece but when you take germany and everybody else and put them in one community we are in worse shape than they are and we get the benefit of the doubt. we are the safe haven and people think that everything is okay because they know that we aren't going to defend because you can print money. when they realize printing is worse than defaulting because the potential for the loss is even greater then we are going to see a big spike in the interest rates and that is when we have our crisis because either the fed allows the rates to go up, and who knows how high they might have to go. let's say 10 percent in order to stop the implosion of the dollar and put an end to inflation. if we have a $20 trillion national debt when that happens that would require us to shell out $2 trillion a year of interest payments. where are we going to get that? that all of the tax. >> you mentioned the creditors. who are the creditors? especially for the united states right now. >> some are other americans who own treasury and large insura
on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no eal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the econom
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